spay/neuter

Successful Clinic Operated in Dominican Republic

DR2014 For the past two years World Vets has been working in the Dominican Republic to address the issue of overpopulation in companion animals. Working alongside local partners, Asociacion de Amigos por los Animales Sosua (AAAS), we recently carried out a successful operative over Memorial Day weekend. On this recent campaign, we provided high volume spay/neuter services in addition to other much needed veterinary care with great results.

We’d like to thank our team of dedicated volunteers, Asociacion de Amigos por los Animales Sosua (AAAS) as well as Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their continued support of our efforts in the Dominican Republic.

World Vets brings veterinary services to the “End of the World”

PG1Punta Gorda, often referred to as the “end of the world” by local inhabitants was the most recent location to benefit from World Vets assistance. As implied by its nickname, Punta Gorda, the southern most town in the country of Belize, very much feels disconnected, forgotten and lived a part from the rest of the country.

One of the major issues concerning animal welfare and health in the region relates to the inability of pet owners to pay for veterinary services. Consequently, the town has been PG34experiencing an exponential growth in the small animal population, in addition to the number of roaming and feral animals.

To help improve the lives of animals at the “end of the world”, World Vets carried out a small animal field service project in collaboration with the newly initiated local humane society.Together we provided, a very successful and first ever, large scale spay/neuter and animal health service campaign. What’s more, all services were provided at no cost to local pet owners.

We would like to thank our dedicated volunteers, all of the local support received as well as Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their continual sponsorship of our animal welfare efforts.

Record Breaking Numbers for Caribbean Pilot Project

N37Last year World Vets received a request for assistance from an animal welfare organization operating on the small Caribbean island of Nevis; a 36 square mile island with only 10,000 local inhabitants located just south of the more famous island St. Kitts. Pet overpopulation was identified as being a major issue for the island’s communities. Given that Nevis is such a small island, World Vets felt compelled to undertake this project as the control and preservation of a healthy animal population is of great importance. For instance, not only 22does it have a huge impact on human health but the overall sustainability of island life as a whole.

To help address issues of health and population control for companion animals on Nevis, World Vets recently operated a pilot project in this location. A pilot project is a location where World Vets has not previously worked or sent a veterinary team. In short, the demand and turn out of animal patients for spay/neuter surgery was incredible. Not only did this campaign break a pilot project record for the total number of surgeries performed, it also outdid our Happyprevious record held on our longstanding small animal project in Ecuador.

We would like to thank CARE Nevis, our volunteer team as well as the local volunteers who worked tirelessly to make this campaign a success and not turn any animal away. We would also like to thank the ministry of agriculture and all of the local island support that was provided to our team and the campaign in general. See pictures

Continual Success: World Vets Small Animal Project in Roatan

140326_3366Roatan is the largest of the Bay Islands located off the coast of Honduras in the Caribbean. Even though it may be the largest island of the archipelago, there is still more to be desired in relation to the health services provided for the small animal population. This is in part due to the limited number of practicing veterinarians on the island as well as the local population’s inability to pay for veterinary services.

To address the growing need for accessible veterinary care, World Vets has 140326_2983been sending veterinary teams to Roatan since 2008. Our teams not only provide much needed spay/neuter services to help control the small animal population, they also provide medical consultations, in addition to treatments for common skin issues, parasites and more.

As a result of World Vets and the efforts of our veterinary teams, up to 1000 surgical procedures have been performed and over 140326_28392000 animals have received quality veterinary care. All of which also contributes to the improvement of the overall animal and human health on the island.

We recently had a volunteer veterinary team in Roatan where hundreds of animals received quality veterinary care and services at no cost. We’d like to thank our dedicated volunteers, local partners and island support for the continual success of this small animal project. We also thank Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their continual support of our efforts there. See pictures of our most recent campaign here

World Vets Team Returns from Belize!

Team Placencia 2 editWe have just had a team return from a successful pilot project executed in Placencia, Belize. Not only was this the first veterinary team we’ve sent to this area it was also the first direct veterinary service campaign for the community they served. As such our team was able to help many animals in need performing free sterilization surgeries as well as health consultations and treatments. We’d like to thank our local partners as well as World Vets volunteers for an outstanding effort. See pictures

A Brand New Beginning for “Nico”

Nico  & Jenny crop

World Vets volunteer, Jenny Shilling, holds “Nico” during our Dominican Republic field operative

The international field service projects that World Vets operates have the potential to positively impact the lives of our volunteers and most importantly the animals they travel to treat. On our most recent field operative in the Dominican Republic, the experience of one volunteer, Jenny Shilling, demonstrates this perfectly.

Before veterinary services started, World Vets team was taken on a “community outreach” tour. This tour highlighted the communities and subsequently the animals that our local partners aid in Sosua and its surrounding areas. Upon driving through an abandoned sugar cane field, they spotted a dead-looking puppy on the side of the path. Before they knew it, the dog sprang up and started chasing down their vehicle as fast as his little puppy feet would go. They stopped and scooped him up.

He was a mess; a scrappy, flea covered, tick covered, extremely dehydrated, shaking

"Nico" gets his picture taken with Santa

“Nico” gets his picture taken with Santa

mess. He had self-inflicted bloody flea infested wounds all over his head, neck, and back as he had frantically tried to scratch the fleas off.

Without hesitating, they wrapped him in a jacket and once back at their accommodations began treating him. After a dose of capstar, two flea baths, picking ticks out of his ears for over an hour, lots of water and food he looked like a totally different dog.

Shortly thereafter, he became the team mascot; staying at team accommodations, eating breakfast with everyone and even accompanying them to the clinic every day where everyone involved loved him unconditionally.

He has since been named “Dominico” or “Nico” for short and has been relocated with Jenny in the United States.

The abandoned sugar cane field is sadly a local dumping site for unwanted puppies. With the 375 sterilizations that World Vets provided in Sosua this year, we have helped to significantly reduce the number of undesired litters in and around this community. And as Jenny states, “This made the work the team did in the Dominican Republic even more rewarding knowing that even one less puppy would be dumped due to sterilization made the entire World Vets mission even more apparent.”

We thank Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their continual support of our spay/neuter operatives in the Dominican Republic

 

2013 Project Spotlight: San Andres Island

Team SAISAI Mar 42 editWith support from Fondation Brigitte Bardot, World Vets sent its first team to San Andres Island in 2012 for a pilot project. Our team’s visit also made history as being the first foreign veterinary brigade to provide free veterinary services on the Island. Before our initial visit and campaign, it had only been Colombian veterinarians from the mainland that provided irregular veterinary relief.    

What prompted our visit and subsequent large scale spay/neuter and preventive health campaign was the request and an invitation from the San Andres Island Department of Health.  They had been urged into action as a result of the worsening plight of its small animal population, consisting of health issues as well as their overpopulation. Given San Andres Island is not very big, it became quite apparent that animal health is not only an animal welfare issue but a concern for public health and safety as well.

This year we scheduled two visits and subsequent veterinary campaigns to aid local efforts in controlling the island’s small animal population as well as tackling disease control and prevention.  Read about one of our success stories from this project here.

We also have an upcoming volunteer opportunity as part of our San Andres Island field service project. Read more about it here and join us in San Andres Island this December!

Special Offering for LVT/RVT: Ecuador November 2013

Ecu17With support from Fondation Brigitte Bardot, PAE – Ibarra and local municipalities, World Vets has been providing regular high volume spay/neuter services in Ecuador since 2009. Spanning the last four years, World Vets has sent 10 veterinary teams (about 150 volunteers) to Ecuador which has brought veterinary care to animals that would otherwise have none.

World Vets has an upcoming volunteer opportunity for an LVT/RVT to Ecuador as Ecu26part of our long standing small animal project there. We will be sending a team to Ibarra, Ecuador in November 2013 and would like to fill the LVT/RVT position as soon as possible. If you are  an LVT/RVT and interested, please write to trips@worldvets.org to learn more about a potential special offering.

Read more about this volunteer opportunity here . See pictures of  World Vets in Ecuador 

An LVT/RVT is a licensed or registered veterinary technician. Certified veterinary technician (CVT) also applies for this position. 

World Vets is in Paraguay this Week!

p2With support from Fondation Brigitte Bardot, a World Vets team has been busy providing a large scale spay/neuter and animal health clinic in poor areas of Asuncion.Our free services are being provided in collaboration with local animal welfare organization “Adoptame” as well as members from national veterinary associations such as AMVEPA and UNASUR.

Before veterinary services began, World Vets field service veterinarian, Dr. Shelley Harper, gave a talk about efficient spay/neuter techniques in relation to providing large scale spay/neuter campaigns. This event was well received and saw 80 Paraguayan vets and veterinary students in attendance!

Read more about our visit here

Welcome Back Team Peru!

WV_Cusco_280813_(09)At the end of August a World Vets team provided a large scale spay/neuter clinic in the city of Cusco, Peru. Services were carried out in collaboration with local partners Pataz Pro Animalista Cusco, Clinica Veterinaria Lazzy Vet and a handful of local veterinarians and volunteers representing these entities. We thank everyone for the great effort that went into providing the three day campaign despite the cold weather! We also thank Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their continual support of our spay/neuter program in Cusco. See pictures here

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