volunteer

Select 2014 Project Locations Announced

130322_1306After much anticipation, select 2014 project locations have been announced on our `upcoming projects` page. All projects listed here will have volunteer opportunities for veterinarians, veterinary technicians, students and assistants. Read more about volunteer descriptions here.

As dates are finalized for these opportunities they will be posted accordingly.  World Vets members will also be given the chance to register early for Spring 2014 volunteer opportunities shortly.

Welcome Back Team Peru!

WV_Cusco_280813_(09)At the end of August a World Vets team provided a large scale spay/neuter clinic in the city of Cusco, Peru. Services were carried out in collaboration with local partners Pataz Pro Animalista Cusco, Clinica Veterinaria Lazzy Vet and a handful of local veterinarians and volunteers representing these entities. We thank everyone for the great effort that went into providing the three day campaign despite the cold weather! We also thank Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their continual support of our spay/neuter program in Cusco. See pictures here

World Vets Summer at Sea: Pacific Partnership 2013

590958_origFrom May until mid August, World Vets had ten volunteer veterinary professionals deployed on the civil- military mission “Pacific Partnership.” They traveled on board a US Navy ship and provided free veterinary and educational services alongside US Army veterinary personnel. Together we provided services in five South Pacific nations which include Samoa, Tonga, the Marshall Islands, Kiribati and the Solomon Islands. As part of the veterinary program, over 6000 animal patients were treated, close to 1000 surgical procedures performed as well as 3644009_orig3000 teaching hours provided to host nation participants.Pacific Partnership is an annual U.S. Pacific Fleet humanitarian and civic assistance mission designed to work by, with and through host and partner nations, non-government organizations and international agencies to build partnerships and a collective ability to respond to natural disasters. World Vets has been the veterinary NGO represented on this mission since 2009. See pictures

World Vets Team Ecuador Sets New Record

1078552_10201394581173898_666054015_oOn our recent visit to Otavalo, Ecuador, a World Vets team provided a large scale spay/neuter campaign with local partners, PAE – Ibarra. We were also joined by a few veterinarians from PAE -Quito who aided our team during the three day campaign. Together our efforts resulted in a record breaking number of surgeries being performed: 268 spay/neuter surgeries.

We thank Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their ongoing support of our work in Ecuador. We also extend our many thanks to those who volunteered their time and energy on this campaign.  See pictures

Attention Students! IVM Program: Winter 2013 Sessions Finalized

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAATTENTION STUDENTS!

IVM Program sessions have been scheduled for Winter 2013. Dates have now been posted on the Upcoming Projects page. World Vets members will have the opportunity to register early for student positions. Following this, registration will open on World Vets website for general sign up. Please note that the full program fee amount will be due at the time of registration.

World Vets International Veterinary Medicine (IVM) Program is World Vets student program. Operating out of our Latin American OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAVeterinary Training Center in Granada, Nicaragua, it provides international students with an opportunity to gain practical veterinary experience. Students read more here

DVM & LVT/RVT Instructors are also needed for this program. To qualify for an instructor position, you must either be a licensed veterinarian and/or technician and have a minimum of one year clinical experience. Previous teaching experience is not a prerequisite. This is a volunteer opportunity with limited expenses for you.

Read more:Veterinarians
Read more: Technicians

World Vets Volunteer Makes Local News in the Marshall Islands

PP13 MI newsMAJURO, Marshall Islands (July 4, 2013) Tori Hall, a volunteer with the non-governmental organization World Vets, lets a Marshallese child listen to the heartbeat of a dog during a Pacific Partnership 2013 health fair.

Pacific Partnership is a mission that brings host nation governments, U.S. military, partner nation militaries and non-governmental organization volunteers together to conduct disaster-preparedness projects and build relationships in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region to better respond during a crisis.World Vets has provided veterinary personnel for this mission since 2009.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Laurie Dexter/Released)

A Successful Pilot Project in Suriname, South America

LS1A7328World Vets recently operated a pilot project* in Paramaribo, Suriname. We sent a volunteer veterinary team that provided a very successful large scale sterilization campaign which resulted in 250 surgeries being performed. Our team worked with Henk Abrahams Foundation, a local animal welfare organization. We thank Fondation Brigitte Bardot for their support of this visit as well as all the volunteers for their efforts. See pictures of our Suriname campaign here

 *A pilot project is a new project location where a World Vets team has not previously worked

World Vets Brings Veterinary Care to Remote Region in Guatemala

RioDulce1A World Vets team has just returned after a great adventure to the Atlantic Coast of Guatemala. Following 7 hours of travel, in a van and boat ride from the capital, they arrived in the Livingston/Rio Dulce region. During their visit they provided free veterinary services, a luxury for local cats and dogs, as local services for animals are hard to come by in such an isolated area. Many communities are only accessible by boat making veterinary care a great challenge.

Our team provided a large scale sterilization campaign where 164 surgeries were RioDulceSXSuitperformed as well as an additional 200 plus health consultations and treatments provided to local animals.  We also saw patients at the dock of our accommodations during the evening along the river. In these activities, we were joined by local volunteers and veterinary students from Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala.

We would like to extend our many thanks and gratitude to our team members and local coordinator, Aska, of El Hotelito Perdido. We would also like to thank CATUR, the RioD 2local Centro de Salud and municipality of Livingston for all their support in helping make this campaign possible. And finally we would like to thank local businesses and the community of Livingston for their warm welcome and hospitality.

See pictures of World Vets visit to Rio Dulce, Guatemala – coming soon!

1 Vet Spot Left for Otavalo, Ecuador Project! July 2013

otavaloThere is just 1 VETERINARIAN spot left open for our July 2013 Otavalo, Ecuador Project. Join us on a trip to the Ecuadorian Andes July 17 – 24, 2013 and provide a three day large scale sterilization campaign in the town of Otavalo!

World Vets has been providing regular high volume spay/neuter services in EcuN59 editEcuador since 2009. We have also secured an agreement with the municipality of Otavalo stipulating that they will not carry out poisoning campaigns in exchange for our free spay/neuter services for community animals.

Aside from veterinary work, volunteers will have free time to explore the area, visit Otavalo’s famous markets and much more! What are you waiting for? Check out this volunteer opportunity here

See pictures of  World Vets in Ecuador here

This project is supported by Fondation Brigitte Bardot of Paris, France

 

Love at First Sight: The Story of Puma

JoePumabefore

Dr. Joe Zulty in recovery with Puma after his leg amputation. World Vets Cusco, Peru project 2012.

It begins in the stone streets of Cusco, an ancient city of 600 thousand people, constructed by the Incas in the magnificent Andes mountains at 3,400 meters above sea level.  There are many dogs in the streets, in doorways, everywhere.  Unlike those of the U.S., these dogs are very talented.  They know how to negotiate the streets, to stop at corners, and incredible how to avoid traffic.

Well, maybe not all of them.

On day two of World Vets spay/neuter clinic, three members of the Peruvian National Police, dressed in green uniforms, appearing strict and emotionless, delivered two dogs that had been running the streets.   Both were discovered with 2 other dogs, all four belonging to a woman who loved them but unfortunately was not capable of providing for them.  The older of the

Dr. Joe Zulty with Puma following World Vets project in Maryland, USA.

Dr. Joe Zulty with Puma following World Vets project in Maryland, USA.

two was scruffy but OK, the younger one however needed our help.  He had a paw that was completely paralyzed and severely swollen. Its appearance was that of the paw of the Puma in the ancient wall of the Saqsayhuaman ruins.  And there was something else worth mentioning.  Perhaps another sign from the Incas, I am not sure.  It is that moment in time that captures your heart and gives a true relevance to why we do what we do.

One of the police officers, a woman who was especially very quiet and very reserved, spoke not with words but with the hardly noticeable tears in her eyes.  Those wet eyes touched me, made their way to my heart, and reinforced what the Incas were trying to tell me.

So the next day, on the last day of clinic, with the help of local Peruvian veterinarian, Dr. Carmen Caceres, the paw that touched but did not feel the surface of the street, was removed.  Incredibly this dog, just 2 hours after surgery, was awake, standing, and wagging his tail!   That was when one of World Vets volunteers stated, “It is not too difficult to take a dog back to the U.S.  We brought a dog back from Ecuador on a past World Vets project.”

With the  assistance of Monica  Chacon of Pataz Pro Animalista Cusco, officer Glenda Anchea Garavito, Dr. Edgar Ochoa and his colleagues at Lazzie Vet Clinic, and the spiritual support of the Incas, the process  of transporting a dog from one hemisphere to another became a reality.   The forces were too strong.  It was meant to be I suppose.  In the airport in Cusco, my son Zack and I , with our new pet Puma, said goodbye to our friends from Cusco and of course the conversation was full of tears.  But special moments like this do not come often.  I was proud to be a veterinarian.  I was proud of having worked with people who make a difference in the life of an animal.  And I am pretty sure the ancient Incas were smiling from above.

**This article was written by Dr. Joe Zulty, a World Vets field service veterinarian. This article reflects his participation on World Vets Cusco, Peru project in 2012 when Puma was assisted and then adopted. Dr. Zulty is leading a World Vets small animal project to Sosua, Dominican Republic in November 2013. Read more about this volunteer opportunity here.

 World Vets has an upcoming volunteer opportunity to Cusco, Peru operating September 28 – October 5, 2013. Volunteer positions remain open for the tech/student category. This position can be filled by licensed vet techs, non-licensed vet techs, vet students, pre-vet students and vet tech students. Read more about this volunteer opportunity here

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